Housing Crisis to End in 2012 as Banks Loosen Credit Standards (Maybe)

While I certainly don’t expect to see any major improvements in the local housing market this year (with respect to average sales prices or price/sqft), I also don’t anticipate any drastic declines. Elk Grove currently only has 238 Single Family Residence listings available on the market (this includes equity sales, short sales, and bank owned homes- one house on one lot).  Couple this with the fact that there are currently 855 Elk Grove Single Family Residence listings in contract (this includes homes listed as short-contingent, pending, and pending/bring backup), and you’ll realize that we are actually seeing the pendulum swing back in the direction of this being a seller’s market! This is NOT to say that prices will sky-rocket. However, the simple laws of supply and demand still apply. There are more buyers out there looking to purchase homes in Elk Grove than there are listings. We’re seeing a lot more bidding wars over competitively priced homes and the average “Days on Market” time before listings are going into contract has dropped substantially.  Dare I say it? Stabilization may be on the horizon.

01/24/2012BY: KRISTA FRANKS Printer Friendly View

Capital Economics expects the housing crisis to end this year, according to a report released Tuesday. One of the reasons: loosening credit.

The analytics firm notes the average credit score required to attain a mortgage loan is 700. While this is higher than scores required prior to the crisis, it is constant with requirements one year ago.

Additionally, a Fed Senior Loan Officer Survey found credit requirements in the fourth quarter were consistent with the past three quarters.

However, other market indicators point not just to a stabilization of mortgage lending standards, but also a loosening of credit availability.

Banks are now lending amounts up to 3.5 times borrower earnings. This is up from a low during the crisis of 3.2 times borrower earnings.

Banks are also loosening loan-to-value ratios (LTV), which Capital Economics denotes “the clearest sign yet of an improvement in mortgage credit conditions.”

In contrast to a low of 74 percent reached in mid-2010, banks are now lending at 82 percent LTV.

While credit conditions may have loosened slightly, some potential homebuyers are still struggling with credit requirements. In fact, Capital Economics points out that in November 8 percent of contract cancellations were the result of a potential buyer not qualifying for a loan.

Additionally, Capital Economics says “any improvement in credit conditions won’t be significant enough to generation actual house price gains,” and potential ramifications from the euro-zone pose a threat to future credit availability.

 

See Actual Article Here.

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